Rambler russian dating site

It would seem that George Bartram retired from business in 1871 & that after he retired the 'Bartram' business moved to what I termed on page 045 'a new shipbuilding yard' at South Dock. Agnes gigs (6 oared open boats), named Gipsy & O&M, rescued the passengers & crew & returned to salvage the cargo which included 450 (have also read 460) live cattle which had been spilled into the sea (& their handlers). on p.261), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Which sounds as though the site to which they moved had not been previously occupied by other shipbuilders. Most WWW sites state that of the cattle were saved & transferred to a small island nearby to await the arrival of another ship to complete their journey. The vessel's end came, it would seem, with an explosion on Dec. It is not clear to the webmaster, from what he has read, which vessel launched that one boat.

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Miramar lists, 8 pages, (highest hull number on page). (233) Names of just a few of the vessels constructed by Sunderland Shipbuilders Co.

Nazaire, France, with a cargo of coal, the vessel was run down by Ethelhilda (built 1897), which was en route from 'Buenos Ayres' to Antwerp & was damaged in the collision. 8 were landed at Dover, Kent, 7 of them by Ethelhilda.

Note that in 1862/63 LR names the vessel Nancy Brysson, but thereafter, until 1873/74, LR consistently records the vessel's name as Nancy Bryson. LR from 1872/73 thru 1874/75 records no owner's names. At daylight the next morning, the crew were rescued by A. Pettingill, a brig under the command of Captain Hull, bound from Philadelphia to Matanzas, Cuba. 11, 1877, made their way to Havana and there embarked on City of Vera Cruz for New York which they reached on Jan. The vessel would seem to have then been owned by Hickson, Sykes & Co., of London (text).

I thank the New York Times for their article (source) of Jan.

We can on page 045, where the Bartram yard was located. the vessel was sold, in 1894, to Japanese owners (G. Fukui Maru was hit by a Russian torpedo & sank in its targeted position. The attack was considered to be a great success even though a narrow access passage still remained open. Gipsy, built 1858, (later renamed Gypsy), still exists today, it would appear, owned by the Padstow Regatta Committee.

I wonder exactly where the 'Haswell thru to Sunderland Shipbuilding Company' yard was located? And when they acquired it, in 1955, it still had a repaired hole in the hull from the horn of one of those deranged animals. There are words about the situation in 'Where Ships Are Born' & since those words have a relevance to this matter, I repeat them here. "Sunderland Shipbuilding Company, known locally as The "Limited" Yard, took over a South Docks site where wood ships were built in the eighteen-sixties by John Haswell. Just 20 pages but with brief (very brief) histories of the seven companies which then comprised the group. I presume that the two names above would be amongst the companies referred to. At launch, was named by Miss Wilson, of Sunderland. Iliff and Mounsey were launching little iron sailing ships and steamers there in the early 'seventies, after which the business was conducted as Mounsey and Foster. to Abergeldie on a page from the Mercantile Navy List and Maritime Directory - for 1887), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). long perpendicular to perpendicular, 3 masts, signal letters WJSF.

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